Aldous Huxley

 

(1894–1963)

Aldous Huxley was born in the United Kingdom, later moved to the U.S.A. He came from a respected family, his grandfather was a famous scientist, his father a writer and his brother a biologist. His mother died, when Huxley was thirteen, and he himself had been since his childhood fighting a serious eye disease. Because of that, he did not have to join the army during World War I. He studied literature and wrote his first novel at the age of seventeen. He made his living as a writer since he was twenty. He moved to the U. S. A. shortly before World War II. His most famous works are The Doors of Perception, Heaven and Hell, the utopic novel Island or the dystopy Brave New World. Huxley is considered one of the most outstanding humanists of the 20th century. He helped to spread the knowledge about the Eastern world in the Western culture and became an idol of the coming generation of the hippies.